7 Coding Myths

7 Coding Myths

There are a million and one myths about coding and coders that make people hesitant to pursue it as a skill.
Myths like “You need to be a maths-whizz” or “I’m too old to learn to code” have stopped too many people from wandering down the coding career-track.
In this post, we’ll unravel some of the most commonly heard coding-myths. Stop worrying, start coding!

1. You Need To Be A Genius To Code

The truth is that anyone who has the desire and willingness to work hard can learn to code. And anyone who can communicate can learn programming. Coding is a language, with its own vocabulary and grammar, and it allows you to communicate with a machine to complete a task.
The languages of code may seem complicated and daunting to learn at first. But the modern programming languages of today are designed to be logical and easy to understand.
Becoming a good web developer isn’t about being smart – it’s about dedication, creativity, and learning how to think to solve problems.

2. Coding Is Boring

Quite the opposite. Technology is everywhere – and where there’s technology, there’s coding.
Coding isn’t just about creating websites. It’s about developing the computer technology found in cars and airplanes, designing video games, developing medical devices and equipment, and space exploration.
Coding is about creativity, it’s about building something useful. Learning to code allows you to dive into almost any kind of industry that interests you. So how could that be boring?

3. It’s Too Late To Learn To Code

It’s never too late. Coding is a field that is rising in demand. There are many coding bootcamps and free resources online that are teaching people of all ages how to code. Many students have little to no coding experience – but by putting in the required work, they are finding success in the classroom and in a career in web technology.
And since technology is always evolving, there are always new things to master – no matter what your age.

4. You Need To Be Good At Math

There is a big misconception that you need to be good at math to be good at coding. But writing code is about writing code – not mathematical formulas. Basic algebra is needed, but only the basics that you learned in school. Game development is one area that does require additional knowledge, such as trigonometry and physics. But even in the development of games, there are plugins and libraries you can use to figure out these mathematical problems.

5. Once You Master A Language, You’re Done Learning

This is completely false. Coding is always evolving and the second you feel you’ve mastered a language, you’ll find tons of new things to learn about it. And then you’ll have to relearn things you learned before because they’ve been updated.
The learning never stops and staying current in the best practices is important – otherwise you will end up knowing outdated software that no one uses anymore.

6. One Language Is Better Than The Rest

Developers like to claim that one language is better than the other, but it’s not true. Every language serves a specific purpose and works a little differently, but it comes down to personal preference. Some languages are easier to work with and more suited for certain tasks than others – but to say one language is superior wouldn’t be a fair statement.

7. I Have To Go To A University To Learn Code

Obtaining a degree from a university is a worthwhile endeavor in many cases. But there are so many resources online – from interactive learning websites like Codecademy and other tutorials – that can teach you coding from the comfort of your home.
Coding bootcamps, like Code Institute, are an efficient way to learn to code. Immersing yourself in the focused and fun environment of a bootcamp will allow you to learn how to code in a matter of weeks, not years – enabling you to get a head start in your career sooner than through a university.